Selling Health Insurance Across State Lines Won’t Save Money

An idea that sounds easy is too complicated to work.

The effort to replace Obamacare faces increasing challenges, the more it is subjected to the harsh light of scrutiny. A good example is the proposal, apparently central to the Republican replacement plans, to allow people to buy health insurance across state lines.

This idea has been put forward as an elixir to all sorts of health sector problems. In his joint address to Congress, President Donald Trump argued that allowing people to buy health insurance in other states would “create a truly competitive national marketplace that will bring costs way down and provide far better care. So important.”

From Bloomberg View – Articles by Peter R. Orszag

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Here’s How Trump Will Change Obamacare

Congress will take symbolic steps while states do the work.

Promises made by Donald Trump and Republicans in Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act are proving to be more complicated than they sounded on the campaign trail. With reality now setting in, what’s most likely to happen?

I expect to see Republicans stage a dramatic early vote to repeal, with legislation that includes only very modest steps toward replacement — and leave most of the work for later. Next, the new administration will aggressively issue waivers allowing states to experiment with different approaches, including changes to Medicaid and private insurance rules. At some point, then, the administration will declare that these state experiments have been so successful, Obamacare no longer exists.

In other words, the repeal vote will be just for show; the waivers will do most of the heavy lifting.

From Bloomberg View – Articles by Peter R. Orszag

 

Chicago’s Model Health-Care Fix

It may not seem obvious from news reports, but health-care costs in the U.S. have been growing remarkably slowly. Among the many forces that have caused the slowdown are efforts such as those by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to change how health-care dollars are spent — a strategy that other cities and states can learn from.

For the past five years, Chicago has kept its health-care bill for employees and retirees roughly flat, at about $450 million a year. And reflected in this success are reforms that hold much promise for the future.

From Bloomberg View – Articles by Peter R. Orszag

We Already Have Health-Risk Scores. Now Let’s Use Them.

Most Americans know they have a personal credit score, and many know where to find it. Few know they also have a personal health-risk score. If these were better known, and better constructed, health insurance markets in the U.S. would work more smoothly.

Commercial health insurance plans, as well as Medicare, Medicaid and other government programs, generate risk scores every year for most of the people they cover. These scores are estimates of each person’s cost of care, compared with the average costs in a large population. And they play a big role in health insurance; they’re often used, for example, to determine how much more insurers are paid for sicker beneficiaries.

From Bloomberg View – Articles by Peter R. Orszag